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Porsche could start building larger engines again by 2026

Porsche says future 911s will be very difficult under Euro7 emissions, but the brand will "never give up".

Porsche has shed some light on the next generation of European emissions regulations, and offered some insight on how it will affect manufacturers worldwide.

Speaking to Australian journalists at the reveal of the new 992-series 911 Targa variants, Porsche 911 and 718 program vice-president Frank-Steffen Walliser explained that EU7 (due in 2026) means “we will see a big change” with the 911’s iconic boxer six-cylinder engine.

“We will see a big change” with the 911’s iconic boxer six-cylinder engine. “We will see a big change” with the 911’s iconic boxer six-cylinder engine.

“It will mean new engines for everybody. I don’t think it’s connected to displacement. I expect 20 per cent higher displacement – a lot of manufacturers will be jumping from four to six, from six to eight… It will be counter-productive because we can’t meet all the regulations without spending fuel," he said.

“We will have bigger catalytic converters by a factor of three to four – there will be an industrial chemical factory in the car to control emissions […] the main reason [for the displacement increase] is because it will take relative power per litre down […] For 911 this becomes very difficult, but we will never give up.”

So, ultimately, what does this mean for the 911?

“We want to keep six cylinders for sure,” Mr Walliser said. “We will have to make a new engine […] we only see a turbo solution.

“There will come a day in the next ten years ... we will have to say, ‘This engine will be the last of its kind’. We will see more engine concepts die.”

And ultimately for the boxer flat-six engine?

“It’s a different story. We will have to wait and see what direction we are going,” Mr Walliser explained.

The European Union has some of the most strict emissions regulations in the world, and over the past decade has forced manufacturers to meet harsh CO2 and NOx reduction targets.

The fallout of this has seen the introduction of smaller, turbocharged engines as well as particulate filters, which have caused notable global supply chain problems for the world’s manufacturers.

“We want to keep six cylinders for sure,” Mr Walliser said of the 911. “We want to keep six cylinders for sure,” Mr Walliser said of the 911.

In Australia, this has meant many new European models end up with carryover engines, as the high sulfur content of our fuel will cause problems in engines fitted with petrol particulate filters necessitated by the latest European requirements.

The current emissions regulations are known as Euro 6d. Euro 7 is expected to be locked in by 2025 for cars with a 2026 model year.

The Euro 7 emissions standard will be designed to force manufacturers selling cars in Europe to cut their average fleet CO2 emissions by 37.5 per cent by 2030.

The move has seen Volkswagen introduce plug-in hybrids in popular business fleet models as a way of bringing down the brand’s overall emissions on the continent.

The European Union has a carbon neutrality target of 2050. These harsh climate targets have been criticised by Groupe PSA (Peugeot/Citroen) CEO Carlos Tavares who said: “Freedom of mobility is something fundamental to our democracies.”

He added such targets cannot come without a cost to employment in the industry or personal liberty.