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Mercedes-Benz headlines latest round of safety recalls

The 2017 Mercedes C-Class coupe has been called back for a faulty locking mechanism on the seat backrests.
Spencer Leech
Contributing Journalist
GoAutoMedia

17 Oct 2018 • 2 min read

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has issued its latest round of safety recalls with seven separate call backs affecting 12 Mercedes-Benz models.

A total of 416 C-Class and E-Class coupes built between May and August 2017 have been recalled due to a faulty locking mechanism on the right side of the seat backrest, and 856 C-Class' sold from May 2016 to January 2018 will also need to brought in for work due to faulty trim which may fall off while driving.

Mercedes has also issued notices for GLE, GLS and GL SUVs, which may be equipped with defective brake calipers. 

This problem potentially affects 977 units sold between May and August 2018, and could see braking power diminish and the pedal travel extending.

Other examples of the aforementioned SUVs, as well as the ML, have been called back for an issue that could see oil foam develop in the oil reservoir. 

This fault affects 3398 units built between February and August 2012, and could lead to oil spraying on hot components in the engine bay, and potentially starting a fire.

A total of 10 Mercedes-AMG GT and GT S sports cars sold between December 2016 and February 2018 will need to go in for work due to a faulty piece of software which can lead to the misidentification of a child seat, leading to the passenger airbag working improperly.

The latest-generation S-Class, sold from November 2017 and February 2018, may be missing two components which mount the CAN bus bars in the vehicle's boot, which could affect the running of the engine as well as seat belt and instrument cluster functionality.

Lastly, 78 vehicles from the GLA, A-Class, B-Class, E-Class, GLC and AMG GT range have been recalled due to potentially defective airbags.

The issue could see metal fragments shoot at occupants upon deployment, similar to the Takata airbag recall, however Mercedes says the two are unrelated.

Do you own one of the Mercedes-Benz models mentioned? Let us know in the comments section below.