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Jeep Cherokee 2018 revealed in Detroit

The Cherokee engine range has expanded to include a 201kW/400Nm 2.0-litre turbo-petrol option, but it will not be coming to Oz.
Justin Hilliard
GoAutoMedia

17 Jan 2018 • 5 min read

Jeep announced further details on its facelifted Cherokee at the Detroit motor show overnight with the mid-size SUV gaining a new engine option, plus a more conventional look revealed last month.

The next Cherokee's headline act is its all-new 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder petrol unit that features direct injection and idle-stop technology, but the bad news is it will not be coming to Australia.

This powerplant punches out 201kW of power and 400Nm of torque, making it the hardest-pulling Cherokee yet.

New front and rear bumpers are joined by a restyled tailgate that incorporates the number plate. New front and rear bumpers are joined by a restyled tailgate that incorporates the number plate.

Alternatively, the pair of naturally aspirated petrol powertrains currently sold in the Cherokee return, albeit with adjusted outputs.

The 3.2-litre 'Pentastar' V6 now develops 202kW/324Nm, up 2kW and 8Nm, but has gone without any major mechanical changes.

Meanwhile, the 2.4-litre 'MultiAir Tigershark' four-pot engine produces 134kW/230Nm – down by 2Nm in torque, but various refinements have helped improve fuel efficiency by up to 7.5 per cent.

Once again, a nine-speed 'TorqueFlite' automatic transmission is exclusively paired to all powertrains, but Jeep says it has been upgraded with "new software that further refines driveability".

As previously reported, the Cherokee's exterior design has been softened, with its polarising split headlights ditched in favour of traditional-looking LED units with daytime running lights.

Inside, changes are less apparent, but the tweaked centre console has been repositioned rearward to create additional storage space for items like a smartphone. Inside, changes are less apparent, but the tweaked centre console has been repositioned rearward to create additional storage space for items like a smartphone.

Furthermore, new front and rear bumpers are joined by a restyled tailgate that incorporates the number plate, as well as a more upright seven-slot front grille and a reshaped bonnet.

Inside, changes are less apparent, but the tweaked centre console has been repositioned rearward to create additional storage space for items like a smartphone.

New trim and upholstery options are available to lift cabin ambience, while rear cargo capacity has increased by over 75mm in width.

Projected onto either a 7.0- or 8.4-inch touchscreen, the Cherokee runs Jeep's fourth-generation 'Uconnect' multimedia system, which has added Apple CarPlay and Android Auto support.

Three different 4x4 systems are on offer in the United States, with 'Active Drive I' featuring a rear-drive module, while 'Active Drive II' adds a two-speed 'Power Transfer Unit' with low-range gear reduction, and Active Drive Lock further includes a mechanically locking rear differential.

However, the exact specifications available in Australia will be announced, alongside pricing, closer to the Cherokee's launch in the second quarter of this year.

Currently, the local Cherokee line-up ranges in price from $35,950 (before on-road costs) for the entry-level Sport to $49,950 for the flagship Trailhawk.

Will Jeep be able to attract Cherokee buyers back with a more conventional look? Tell us what you think in the comments.

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