Hyundai Kona Electric 2018 revealed ahead of Geneva

28 February 2018
 by 
, GoAutoMedia

Hyundai has revealed details and imagery of its Kona Electric as it readies the new small SUV for its public debut at Geneva next week and an expected Australian on-sale date later this year.

In keeping with Hyundai's commitment to release 31 "eco-friendly" vehicles by 2020, the South Korean brand is set to launch the world's first fully-electric small SUV capable of travelling up to 470 kilometres on a single charge.

Globally, the Kona Electric will be available with two powertrains.

To look at, the Kona Electric is not so different from its conventionally powered siblings. To look at, the Kona Electric is not so different from its conventionally powered siblings.

The base version gets a 99kW/395Nm powertrain with a 39.2kWh battery that is capable of traveling 300 kilometres between charges, meanwhile a more powerful 150kW/395Nm set-up with a 64kWh lithium-ion battery will also be offered, delivering a claimed driving range of 470 kilometres.

Power is sent to the front wheels via a single-speed reduction gear transmission, pulling the car from 0-100km/h in 9.3 seconds or 7.6s for the 99kW and 150kW versions respectively, with energy consumption rated at 14.8kWh and 15.2kWh per 100km.

If Hyundai Australia indeed picks up the Kona Electric, we expect it will only offer the more powerful of the two electric donks.

Charging the Kona Electric through a standard AC charging port takes six hours and 10 minutes for the 99kW version and nine hours and 40 minutes for the long-range 150kW version.

The 7.0-inch touchscreen multimedia system is compatible with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and an eight-speaker Krell sound system handles audio. The 7.0-inch touchscreen multimedia system is compatible with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and an eight-speaker Krell sound system handles audio.

Charging time drops significantly when connected to a 100kW DC fast charger, with Hyundai claiming it takes just 54 minutes to regenerate to 80 per cent battery capacity, regardless of the powertrain in question.

To look at, the Kona Electric is not so different from its conventionally powered siblings, albeit a closed grilled, redesigned headlights and a handful of minor touches throughout to give an "elegant touch to the sporty SUV".

On the inside, the Kona Electric features a bespoke centre console to facilitate operation of the shift-by-wire module and a new 7.0-inch cluster that displays information like battery charge level, energy flow and driver mode.

Boot space is unchanged from the petrol-powered Kona at 373 litres, however the lack of a need for a gear lever and mechanical linkages has translated to a new storage compartment underneath the console.

Charging the Kona Electric through a standard AC charging port takes six hours and 10 minutes for the 99kW version and nine hours and 40 minutes for the long-range 150kW version. Charging the Kona Electric through a standard AC charging port takes six hours and 10 minutes for the 99kW version and nine hours and 40 minutes for the long-range 150kW version.

The 7.0-inch touchscreen multimedia system is compatible with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and an eight-speaker Krell sound system handles audio.

The fully-electric Kona will be available with three different roof colours, enabling 21 possible colour combinations.

A vast array of driver assistance systems are on-board including adaptive cruise control, auto emergency braking with pedestrian detection, lane departure warning, lane keep assist, rear cross-traffic alert, blind spot detection, high-beam assist, driver attention warning and speed limit information.

On the inside, the Kona Electric features a bespoke centre console to facilitate operation of the shift-by-wire module and a new 7.0-inch cluster that displays information like battery charge level, energy flow and driver mode. On the inside, the Kona Electric features a bespoke centre console to facilitate operation of the shift-by-wire module and a new 7.0-inch cluster that displays information like battery charge level, energy flow and driver mode.

The current top-spec Kona Highlander AWD starts at $36,000 before on-road costs in Australia, so the addition of an electric powertrain could push the Kona towards the $50,000 mark.

Hyundai Australia is yet to officially confirm if the Kona Electric will arrive Down Under, though we expect more information to come to light after the car is revealed at the Geneva motor show next week.

Check out all 2018 Hyundai Kona price and spec info here.

Would you like to see the Hyundai Kona Electric come to Australia? Let us know what you think in the comment section below.

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