Hyundai ACCC undertaking to improve consumer guarantees

8 February 2018
 by 
, GoAutoMedia

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has accepted an undertaking by Hyundai Motor Company Australia (HMCA) to better comply with consumer guarantee obligations set under the Australian Consumer Law (ACL).

The ACCC, Australia's corporate watchdog, had previously identified industry-wide problems with the way in which car manufacturers were handling consumer guarantee complaints.

ACCC chairman Rod Sims suggests that the Hyundai partnership is a step in the right direction and hopes that other manufacturers will follow suit.

"Hyundai worked constructively with us and formally committed to improve their systems to comply with consumer guarantees. By putting the consumer law front and centre, Hyundai is seeking to ensure its customers get what they're legally entitled to when they experience a problem with their vehicle," he said.

"More broadly, the car industry needs to lift its game in handling consumer guarantee complaints. The ACCC calls on other car manufacturers to follow Hyundai's lead by providing similar formal commitments."

HMCA has vowed to notify all new customer of their rights in relation to statutory consumer guarantees and will provide them with the ability to access information about any technical and safety issues with their vehicle.

The company says it will review relevant complaints received in the last 12 months, and as part of its commitment to the ACL, will now provide written reasons when vehicle remedy requests are declined.

HMCA chief operating officer Scott Grant hopes that this undertaking will help show good faith to Hyundai customers.

"This program will be constructive and beneficial and make our commitment to customers even more obvious," he said.

"Although Hyundai is not perfect – no company can be – we are always striving to improve. We feel it's important to clearly demonstrate that to the people who buy our cars."

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