Menu

Browse over 9,000 car reviews

Sorry, there are no cars that match your search

Honda CR-V 2018 range sees the addition of base Vi grade


There's a new entry-point to the Honda CR-V 2018 model range, with the Japanese company announcing the addition of a new Vi grade to open the line-up.

The Honda CR-V Vi takes a different tack to the rest of the range, adopting a new engine to help it achieve its attractive $28,290 (plus on-road costs) list price.

This entry-grade model is powered by a 2.0-litre four-cylinder petrol engine with a continuously variable transmission (CVT) automatic, and is front-wheel drive only. The drivetrain sets the Vi apart from the rest of the range, as it's the only model to be offered without the 1.5-litre turbo-petrol engine.

  • Inside, the Vi has cloth seat trim, a smaller 5.0-inch media screen with Bluetooth phone and audio streaming (no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto). Inside, the Vi has cloth seat trim, a smaller 5.0-inch media screen with Bluetooth phone and audio streaming (no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto).
  • Thankfully, it retains the CR-V's excellent digital instrument cluster with digital speedometer, although the media screen definitely looks 'affordable'. Thankfully, it retains the CR-V's excellent digital instrument cluster with digital speedometer, although the media screen definitely looks 'affordable'.

The outputs of the new engine are modest: 113kW of power (at 6500rpm) and 189Nm (at 4300rpm), which is about 20 per cent less power and torque than the turbocharged version (140kW/240Nm).

Fuel consumption is rated at 7.6 litres per 100 kilometres, which is just a touch thirstier than the turbo FWD VTi spec (7.0L/100km).

The new Vi spec still gets 17-inch alloy wheels, LED daytime running lights, LED tail-lights, a full-size alloy spare wheel and tyre pressure monitoring. 

Inside, the Vi has cloth seat trim, a smaller 5.0-inch media screen with Bluetooth phone and audio streaming (no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto). Thankfully, it retains the CR-V's excellent digital instrument cluster with digital speedometer, although the media screen definitely looks 'affordable'.

  • Honda Australia director, Stephen Collins, said the company is still investigating the application of further safety equipment across other models in the range. Honda Australia director, Stephen Collins, said the company is still investigating the application of further safety equipment across other models in the range.
  • The Honda CR-V Vi takes a different tack to the rest of the range. The Honda CR-V Vi takes a different tack to the rest of the range.

As with the VTi grade, there is no 'LaneWatch' system (a camera-based passenger-side blind-spot monitor that displays on the centre screen) and there's still no auto emergency braking (AEB) in any grade but the flagship VTi-LX.

Honda Australia director, Stephen Collins, said the company is still investigating the application of further safety equipment across other models in the range.

"Where we can, at model launches, updates and introductions, we will be adding AEB and if possible, Honda Sensing," Collins said, referring to the full suite of safety technology that includes forward collision warning, full-speed AEB, adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning and lane keeping assist.

The outputs of the new engine are modest: 113kW of power (at 6500rpm) and 189Nm (at 4300rpm). The outputs of the new engine are modest: 113kW of power (at 6500rpm) and 189Nm (at 4300rpm).

The brand has just launched an updated version of the Honda HR-V, which adds a city-speed AEB system on all grades. That AEB system works at speeds up to 30km/h.

Honda Australia is also working to deliver a new seven-seat entry-grade model, a la the Mitsubishi Outlander and Nissan X-Trail. That model is expected to retain the turbocharged four-cylinder engine, but will be front-wheel drive. Expect it on sale by early 2019.

Would you be enticed by the base model Honda CR-V? Tell us what you think in the comments below.

View cars for sale