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Ford Mondeo probe over possible German emissions cheat

The KBA has launched an investigation into diesel versions of the Ford Mondeo sold in Germany.

Ford has come under fire from Germany's Federal Motor Transport Authority, the KBA, over diesel versions of its current-generation Mondeo mid-sizer, which are alleged to have an emissions cheating device installed.

According to German business magazine WirtschaftsWoche, the country's Ministry of Transport commissioned the KBA to investigate Mondeos fitted with the 2.0-litre TDCi engine after questionable results from emissions tests were obtained.

However, the allegations have been denied, with Ford Germany CEO Gunnar Herrmann saying the Blue Oval "neither cheated, nor used tricks".

 The carmaker said it will assist the KBA with the investigation, which is already being conducted by an unnamed institute.

"No illegal shut-off devices were used in our diesel exhaust after-treatment systems,'' he added.

Furthermore, Ford reaffirmed all of its models and engines satisfy existing emissions standards.

Nevertheless, the carmaker said it will assist the KBA with the investigation, which is already being conducted by an unnamed institute.

Sold in Australia across three model grades and two body styles, the Mondeo's local 2.0-litre TDCi turbocharged four-cylinder diesel unit produces 132kW of power and 400Nm of torque.

Its fuel economy is rated between 5.1-5.3 litres per 100 kilometres on the combined cycle test, while carbon dioxide emissions check in from 135-140 grams per kilometre.

Daimler, BMW, Volkswagen and Opel agreed to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions levels in their diesel vehicles by at least 25 per cent on average.

Various sources claim Ford's Focus small car and C-Max people mover have also been subject to a KBA investigation, but no illegal emissions cheating devices were found in these models.

Earlier this month, German manufacturers Daimler, BMW, Volkswagen and Opel agreed to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions levels in their diesel vehicles by at least 25 per cent on average.

About 5.3 million vehicles in Germany would benefit from the proposed measures, which will involve an engine control unit (ECU) software update for Euro5- and Euro6-compliant models.

Additionally, BMW and Volkswagen have separately announced plans to offer incentives to new car buyers in the European Union and Germany respectively, who would trade in their older, more pollutant vehicles for newer, greener alternatives.

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