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2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed ahead of LA | video

2017 Mazda CX-5

Australia's best-selling SUV gets all-new bodywork on top of new tech for its second generation.

Mazda has endowed the second-generation of its most-successful SUV ever with an avolutionary look that belies the number of changes beneath the car.

The new CX-5, which first launched in Australia in 2012, will be released locally in the second quarter of 2017.

Updated interior ergonomics and Mazda's new torque-steer stability system are complemented by additional safety equipment for Australia's number one SUV.

Mazda Australia marketing director Alastair Doak told CarsGuide.com.au the CX-5 has plenty of firepower left.

"If you wanted a textbook case for a car, then I think the CX-5 would be it. It just ticks all the boxes," he said. "Sales have just climbed every year since 2012, it's been the leader in its segment for the last three years and outright SUV for the last couple of years, as well, in all categories.

"We obviously have a big owner base, and I think they'll appreciate the changes. It'll be very obvious to them, which is good."

The exterior's biggest tweak is the relocation of the A-pillars, which have been shuffled back by 35mm, while the front bar has adopted a more bluff grille and skinnier headlight strip to mimic the CX-9's updated Kodo design language.

It's also being offered in an updated shade of Mazda's iconic Soul red.

The lower half of the rear tailgate has been changed as well, with new, narrower taillights fitted and the number plate surround smoothed out.

The body-in-white has also been strengthened, with more pieces of ultra high-strength steel in the A- and B-pillars and the side sills giving a 15.5 per cent improvement in torsional stiffness.

The measurements between the current car and the updated version are nearly the same. The US-market CX-5 seen here is 10mm shorter overall at 4550mm, and 20mm lower at 1690mm than the first-gen version.

The wheelbase remains the same at 2700mm and the width at 1840mm, despite a 10mm wider track front and rear on the facelifted version; this is most likely down to the new alloys adding more offset.

  • 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show
  • 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show
  • 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show
  • 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show
  • 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show
  • 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show 2017 Mazda CX-5 revealed | LA motor show

Mazda claims the A-pillar shuffle will aid driver visibility, while the centre console and gearshift unit have been lifted by up to 60mm to place the shifter closer to the driver.

All-new front seats will offer greater comfort in the base thanks to urethane foam along with better torso support, as well.

The rear seats are now lower, and have a two-stage back recliner, revised cushions and seat heaters will now be available.

Boot space – a bugbear with the current CX-5 - is said to have been improved slightly; up five litres to 505 litres (DIN) with the seats in position. 

Additional interior equipment includes a new 4.6-inch colour screen for the instrument cluster, a heads-up display with navigation function and a Bose ten-speaker stereo with A-pillar mounted tweeters.

The driver will also get a better view of the familiar 7.0-inch tablet-style multimedia screen, which has been moved slightly.

Mazda has also added the latest version of its radar cruise control set-up to the CX-5, which has the ability to keep following the car in front even after it has stopped, along with traffic sign recognition.

The G-Vectoring Control system, which is currently used in the Mazda3 and Mazda6, has been added to the CX-5. It essentially matches engine torque to steering inputs to settle the steering and ride quality at the front of the car.

The company says the system is more effective in taller vehicles like SUVs.

Wider diameter front shocks, fluid-filled body bushings and stiffened steering mounts tidy up the chassis tune.

The current drivetrain combinations – which comprise a 2.0-litre petrol, 2.5-litre petrol and a 2.2-litre diesel in front- and all-wheel drive formats – remain untouched. There's no word yet when the 2.5-litre turbocharged unit from the CX-9 will be added to the CX-5 line-up.

Has Mazda done enough to the CX-5 to keep it fresh? Tell us what you think in the comments below.

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