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Next-gen Holden ute and wagon going to US?

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    The Pontiac G8 Sport Truck proved extremely popular with enthusiasts who quickly branded it a modern-day El Camino.

The future is starting to look very bright for the Holden Commodore.

After development of a next-generation Commodore was confirmed recently, Holden was then picked to spearhead the development of two new cars for the Chinese market.

Those two new cars will be based on what GM describes as “global platforms” and are believed to be Chinese versions of the next-generation Holden Commodore and its long-wheelbase variant, the Caprice, both due out around 2016 and likely to be sold in China either as Buicks or Chevrolets.

And on top of all that, there’s speculation that a facelifted version of the Commodore due out next year, or at least the Caprice, will be sold in the US as a Chevrolet SS (short for SuperSport) and even raced in NASCAR. Assuming the speculation turns out to be accurate, the success of the Australian-built Chevrolet SS in the U.S. market will determine if a successor is launched.

Carsguide has previously reported that GM bosses are already considering launching a successor for the Chevrolet SS based on the next-generation Commodore, but instead of sourcing it from Australia GM would like to build a local version. 

Not only would local production avoid the shortfalls of exchange rate fluctuations and shipping costs, a locally-produced Commodore derivative would be more desirable to law enforcement agencies--a vital element for increasing sales. GM found out with the current Australian-built Chevrolet Caprice PPV, many departments would like the vehicle but are prevented from purchasing it due to its foreign production.

Additionally, local production would provide GM with the opportunity to launch low volume models like a wagon or ute pickup as it wouldn’t be as risky compared to a full import program as all three variants could be built from the same production line. For this reason, GM is reportedly considering launching locally-built versions of the next-generation Holden Commodore ute and wagon for the U.S. market.

A few years back when GM showed off the Pontiac G8 Sport Truck, which was essentially rebadged Commodore ute. The vehicle proved extremely popular with enthusiasts who quickly branded it a modern-day El Camino. Perhaps, one day, the U.S. will have such a vehicle again. Stay tuned for an update.

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Comments on this story

Displaying 3 of 3 comments

  • Hey Dilan,
    I don’t know whether you know this or not. But, even Australia has aprogram called buy local, which eans prefernece in tenders is given to local suppliers and manufacturers first then if they are not good enough they look at other alternatives, sometimes the local product is even more expensive, its all about supporting local suppliers ad has got nothing to do with trade agreements.

    Jerry Atrick of B Posted on 07 May 2012 4:14pm
  • “...GM found out with the current Australian-built Chevrolet Caprice PPV, many departments would like the vehicle but are prevented from purchasing it due to its foreign production….”

    What happened to the free trade agreement between the two countries????

    Bloody yanks and their one way mentallity!  Like in the school yard, bullies shouldn’t be tollerated…. well neither should they be in this instance either!

    Dilan of Melbourne Posted on 06 May 2012 1:41pm
  • Don’t know why GM USA is taking so long to make a decision on importing the Commodore range as it’s a no brainer. The Commodore sedan is a far better car than the Malibu & Impala, the ute would be perfect as a modern day El Camino and with the demise of the Chrysler 300C wagaon / Dodge Magnum Chevy would have the only rear drive sports wagon in the class.

    Jim C of Sydney Posted on 05 May 2012 8:57am

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